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What’s wrong with these comparisons?

with 10 comments

Anyone?

  • The tusk of a mastodon is bigger than an elephant.
  • The Concorde was faster than any airplane.
  • That film was more funnier than the one we saw last week.
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Written by ElenaBen

March 3, 2008 at 11:07 am

10 Responses

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  1. I think the first sentence has no sense because a tusk can not be bigger than an elephant!
    In the second one I think is better to use the superlative: “The Concorde was the fastest airplane”. Could it be?
    The last one is wrong because the comparative form of funny is funnier, not “more funnier”

    Irene

    March 3, 2008 at 8:19 pm

  2. Yep, but in the second one you can also use the comparative but with something else…any ideas?
    and how would you then transform sentence nr. 1?
    (good job!)

    tutorelena

    March 3, 2008 at 9:20 pm

  3. The Concorde was faster than any other airplane?

    The tusk of a mastodon is bigger than an elephant’s?

    Irene

    March 4, 2008 at 9:57 am

  4. The first one is perfect! When comparing people or items that are grouped together, it may be necessary to use the word ‘other’ or ‘else’ to make the meaning clear. The second one isn’t balanced, though. Your answer would be ok if the original sentence were: “the mastodon’s tusk is bigger than…” because when comparing things, you have to use the same pattern on both sides of the comparison to make it readable and clear. Of course anyone can understand what you’re trying to say but it’s a matter of style. So what would it be, then? 😉 -you deserve a beer or 2-

    tutorelena

    March 4, 2008 at 11:56 am

  5. Then the sentence would be “The tusk of a mastodon is bigger than the tusk of a elephant”.

    3 beers? ;p

    Irene

    March 4, 2008 at 2:10 pm

  6. Yes, that’s it! ‘the tusk of a mastodon is bigger than that of an elephant’. Well done! (3 beers????)

    tutorelena

    March 4, 2008 at 2:55 pm

  7. my attempt…
    The Concorde was faster than any airplane was

    Gorka

    March 5, 2008 at 3:33 pm

  8. Hi Gorka!

    The problem in that sentence is not the verb but the comparison structure. If you say “The concorde was faster than any airplane”, this sentence makes it sound as though the Concorde were some other kind of machine, maybe not an airplane. As if Concorde were a different means of transportation. That’s why you need to include ‘other’: “The Concorde was faster than any OTHER airplane”. By saying so, you’re making clear that Concorde was, indeed, a kind of airplane, and the fastest.

    I don’t know if I’m making myself clear here, so tell me if you don’t understand, I’ll try to come up with more examples.

    Thanks!

    tutorelena

    March 6, 2008 at 10:02 am

  9. ‘Concorde’ sounds more natural than ‘the Concorde’.

    Gascard

    October 9, 2008 at 10:37 am

  10. That film was more funnier than the one we saw last week

    – That film was more funnier than the OTHER we saw last week.

    Maitane

    November 19, 2015 at 4:15 pm


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